RossBoxing.com



Developing A Recipe For Success

By Ross Enamait - Published in 2004



I have received several emails from aspiring boxers and athletes who are looking to develop a complete training program. These individuals seek assistance compiling a program that integrates strength training, plyometrics, sprint work, conditioning, skill work, and more. There are numerous training techniques available, which often leave the athlete confused and befuddled when constructing a weekly regimen.

There are many pieces in the complex puzzle that formulates a complete athlete. Time constraints, busy work schedules, family responsibilities, and class work only add to the madness. There is only so much time in a day, yet so many exercises you wish to perform.

How do you fit everything into one complete workout schedule?

One of the best ways to create a training schedule is by viewing your workout as a recipe for success. When preparing a meal for dinner, you follow a recipe with certain ingredients. Certain meals taste better than others. These tasty meals are better for a variety of reasons. The quality of their ingredients may be superior. A meal may be cooked too long or not long enough. The amount of a certain ingredient may be too little or too much. An extra tablespoon of salt can ruin the meal…

Although this is not a cooking class, many of these ideas transfer to the fitness world. A recipe for athletic success includes superior exercise selection. It allows for better use of limited training time. Certain recipes prescribe longer rest periods, more or less intensity, more or less repetitions, and so on. Numerous training systems and techniques are available. The athlete may not have time to perform each and every exercise that he desires. He must make best use of his time.

Let’s take a look at a few simple steps you can take to outline your own training program.

  1. One of the most important steps in developing a complete program is determining your training goals and objectives. How bad do you really want it? Do you want to get in shape or do you want to win a championship?

  2. Another important step is to determine how much time you have available to train each day of the week. Do you have 1, 2, or 3 hours each day? Do you plan to train in the morning and/or night? Write down your available training times on a piece of paper.

  3. What are you good at, what areas require improvement? For example, if you are an excellent boxer with great technique but always run out of gas, you will need to focus on conditioning.

  4. Next, jot down the different types of training that you wish to include in your program. A few examples include skill training, sparring, strength training, anaerobic conditioning drills, running, and plyometrics.

Once you have your list of available times and types of training, you can begin to piece together the puzzle. Let’s look at a quick example.

Below is a list of training techniques that you may wish to include in your workout.

  • Conditioning drills - 2 or 3 days per week
  • Plyometrics - Not to be performed on consecutive days
  • Strength training - 2 or 3 days per week
  • Sparring - Not to be performed on consecutive days
  • Skill training - 4 or 5 days per week
  • Core training - 3 days per week

Suppose that you have 6 days per week available to train. You have allocated between 1 and 2 hours per day. Let’s put these pieces together into one complete puzzle.




Sample Week


Monday: Skill training – Conditioning drills

Tuesday: Sparring – Skill training – Core training

Wednesday: Shadow boxing - Strength training - Plyometrics

Thursday: Sparring – Skill training – Core training

Friday: Skill training – Conditioning drills

Saturday: Shadow boxing - Strength training – Plyometrics – Core training

Sunday: Rest



A serious fighter would also add a roadwork program to this schedule. Roadwork consists of various sprints, intervals,